What platforms are folks running Node-Red on?

Curious as to what platforms folks are running their Node-Red flows. Current I'm using my laptop but that's only temporary.

John

1 Like

Think most use Raspberry Pi. I run currently in a Synology NAS via docker, but I have a Pi4 on the way.

Great post for content and learning value. Looks like a good one to cut me json teeth on. Thanks!

2 Likes

I started on my NAS to play with, and see how I got along. I then installed on a PI 4.

1 Like

Cancel it. Seriously. Get an Odroid with an eMMC instead. Data integrity is so much better with an eMMC (I've lost microSDs twice to data corruption).

4 Likes

Got link? Linux noob which is why the Pi.

Not had any issue with PI's here. Although I did read that A2 cards are much better for I/O rates.

2 Likes

Yup. Here it is - Odroid XU4Q ($60 - there are newer faster models, but this octacore SBC is pretty fast):

This is the cheapest case ($7):

And you'll need a 16GB eMMC ($16).

And a power supply ($7.50):

I know it adds up - but these things run circles around RPis. And they run full Ubuntu .....

3 Likes

Because Node itself runs on so many platforms, Node-Red runs on them too.

I explored Node-Red with Hubitat on a Raspberry-Pi3b+, once I had it working and could see I'd actually use it, I moved it onto the same Production server I'm using for Homebridge.. an always on, headless, Mac Mini. It's also where my HubConnect NodeJS Server is running too. They are all Node 'apps'.

3 Likes

I was actually thinking of the smallest Pi I could get that would work from a harddrive. After converting a few laptops to SSD's I have an abundance of 2.5" drives collecting dust.

The Odroid XU4Q looks cool but for node-red isn't just burning a lot of electricity needlesly?

2 Likes

I had it running on a Pi3 for a little bit while I evaluated the utility and then I found a used USFC workstation (Dell Optiplex) running a Core i5-4570S for $80, slapped a SSD in it, installed Ubuntu server and was off to the races.

Sure, it sucks a bit more power than a Pi4, but... 80 bucks and I've got some headroom to use it for other things... :slight_smile:

2 Likes

So I don't have power statistics and it certainly pulls more than pi zero.

But I have all my "servers" running on a single Odroid. I was using an XU4; I'm now using an Odroid N2. This includes: PiHole, nginx for a reverse proxy, sendmail, two instances of homebridge, several NodeJs servers in addition to Node-RED, a DLNA server, two print servers, an MQTT server, and other things I'm forgetting. Got a couple SSDs hanging off it that are mounted via NFS or SMB to other computers for backup ....

2 Likes

Holding out for the ODROID-N2+ shipping at months end. I'm a more long term, buy the best of bread, kinda guy. Good thing since their site is down now.

1 Like

Good decision. 64-bit hexacore processor and it supports Ubuntu 20.04 - still recommend you get an eMMC. Even though it does support booting from USB (SSD).

Edit: I agree with your philosophy. Five years ago when I got my first XU4, it was about twice the price of the RPi 2B+. Here we are five years later, and it still holds it own in benchmarks against the RPi 4 (except it isn't 64-bit).

1 Like

:+1:

On second thought gonna bump up the capacity, on sale and all lol

1 Like

another answer is set up a proxmox box being able to setup a new (virtual) server in minutes is pretty sweet.

mine is running node red grafana mqtt and influxdb currently

3 Likes

I had a plenty beefy box already and it still has lots of headroom so this is what I'm running on

Dell Precision T3600
Intel Xeon E5-1620 @3.60GHz
8GB RAM
RAID1 disks

NR installed natively, no Docker, on Arch Linux.

Why Arch? Because giving a little blood is OK with me :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

1 Like

Used to say the same thing about Gentoo of course I WANT to compile my OS :rofl:

2 Likes

Maybe a separate thread about hardware in is order...

3 Likes

working on it :wink:

2 Likes

YAHP (Yet Another Hardware Post)
I must admit to being temped by this

The Chuwi LarkBox is a tiny computer that measures just 2.4″ x 2.4″ x 1.7″ but which is a full-fledged PC capable of running Windows 10 or other desktop operating systems.

Powered by a 10-watt Intel Celeron J4115 quad-core processor, the LarkBox has 6GB of RAM, 128GB of eMMC storage.

1 Like