Most popular protocols in 2021 (a user's perspective)

I was referring the the Bridge-Hubitat communication; which is WIFI.

When I refer to WIFI; I am talking about the connect between Lutron and Hubitat.

Technically, the Lutron SmartBridge to Hubitat hub is wired Ethernet (unless one adds a USB WiFi adapter to the Hubitat Hub.) Same is true for the Philips Hue bridge to Hubitat integration. :wink:

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I pulled my Inovelli Red switches. I found that they were drowning out my Z-wave network. I had a few of them on the network. After I pulled them and Zooz multi sensors my Z-wave network and Hub works perfectly.

The zooz multi sensors were the problem. It's a known issue widely reported on the forums. I don't use the power monitoring feature but don't have any slowdowns with the reds.

The hub can usually handle 1 or 2 of the multi's but going over that causes issues. Especially if you paired them as S0.

A lot of repeating can also bog down your mesh. Especially when you add in a spammy device.

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Correct. I should have said local networking. I actually use WIFI bridges for most of my connections but I should have said local networking. I usually add a WIFI Mesh system (TP Link Decos) to all homes that I setup. I then find a perfect center location for the Lutron hub and Hubitat; I use the ethernet off the WIFI mesh.

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I was worried that all 700 series devices had issues. Though I did pull Inovelli at the same time as the Zooz sensors. My goal was to minimize Z-wave and switching to all Lutron for switches was one way to do it.

I split mine 50/50 so neither radio would get overloaded.

Telnet via ethernet, no wifi involved at all

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I should have said local network but I use WIFI for that traffic as per above.

I avoid Z-wave now and my reliability is so much higher.

A lot of little things you can do to improve reliability for both ZigBee and zwave.

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If Zigbee requires less work then it is worth it to me. I setup smart homes for customers and I can not afford even small issues.

ZigBee isn't without its' own problems. Wifi interference can be a nightmare to deal with. Especially if you have no control over the source of the interference. I use some wide channels for throughput and cover the whole spectrum.

The Netgear ssid's are my neighbors but the rest is me.

Not to mention all the cheap devices that don't adhere to the protocol.

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Are you trying to tell me that a lot of devices don't follow established protocols and don't always work as intended with things that do? I do not believe you sir! :rofl:

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My order of protocols are:

  • Z-Wave - Switches, dimmers, door locks, and some sensors from Dome only lose a z-wave message once in a blue moon
  • ZigBee - Wall plug switches and dimmers Centralite and Peanut, but testing out Zigbee switchable outlets, Samsung Buttons and Leak sensors, Zigbee for most battery devices so far.
  • Wifi - Avoiding due to IoT support will be much better in Wifi 7 when released in 2 to 3 years. Been testing Shelly Button 1's

I have been watching the "Matter" groups publications. They seem to be going down the route of local control but each vendor that is participating has their own stake in the game and could bail out at anytime and make another incompatible standard. Thread is the protocol and is based on work done by Silicon Labs and Ring. I am also interested in long range Z-Wave but haven't heard many updates on that.

Here is a decent article on Matter's chips and radios:

https://www.edn.com/wireless-chips-available-amid-matter-smart-home-launch-in-2022/

Can I ask why? This seems a little odd. I have lots of zwave in my house (plus Lutron and zigbee) and don't have any zwave issues, but I would never get a zwave lock. (I use a Schlage zigbee).

None of my zwave devices are paired with any type of security and a lock is one of the few items where secure pairing is desirable. Plus zigbee locks just seem to have fewer problems when it comes to door locks.

I like all three protocols (Zigbee, Lutron, Zwave) and believe they all have their place. I use all three and have never really had any issues. Having said this I definitely choose one protocol over another based on the task.

I do agree with this. If you are in a saturated area then this may very well be a problem. I personally have not experienced this issue in my many locations probably because they are large homes or warehouses which do not have a lot of WIFI interference.

If this is a problem you should know right away.

I have used a lot of Z-wave over the years and I have one location with more then 100 z-wave switches (I use a homeseer hub for this locaiton). I have to pay a lot of attention to locations with z-wave switches. I have put Zigbee recently in multiple locations and just do not have the issues I have with Z-wave.

I do find that if you have a few devices and they talk directly to the hub then you do not have problems.

Those locks follow my rule of talking directly to the hub. I will use Zigbee locks in the future; though I have not tried them yet.

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